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Lodge a complete General Skilled Migration application for a quicker result

Date:-4-April-2016
migrationblog.border.gov.au

 

Have you been invited to apply for a General Skilled Migration visa through SkillSelect?
Did you know most complete applications are finalised within three months of lodgement?
Your application is considered complete if you upload all required documentation listed on the document checklist, plus form 80 and form 1221, to ImmiAccount. You must also undertake health examinations before we assess your application.
Incomplete applications will take longer to process, but are usually finalised within six months if you provide requested documents quickly via ImmiAccount.
For further information, view the SkillSelect information.

news

sc457 workers will lose jobs if income threshold is increased

Date:-16-October-2015
Migration Alliance

 

Labor has proposed an increase in the TSMIT under 457 scheme from a market rate of $53,900 to $57,000.
The proposal goes directly against the sc457 review committee’s recommendation that the TSMIT is frozen at $53,900 as well as DIBP figures showing that current average wages in the key industry sectors where sc457 workers are hired are well below Labor’s proposal.
If accepted, Labor’s compromise plan for passage of the China free-trade agreement would knock out more than one quarter of this year’s 457 visa program and price some regional areas out of the scheme, according to a report in The Australian.[showhide] Immigration Department figures obtained by The Australian show that, of the 13,239 visas granted under the 457 category to the end of September, 3581 fell below the proposed $57,000 threshold, equivalent to 27 per cent or over a quarter of all visas granted.
Of those, 581 or 4.4 per cent of the 457 visas granted were right on the current threshold of $53,900, notes The Australian.
Immigration Department figures show average wages in accommodation and food services in Queensland ($56,500) and Tasmania ($56,400) would not be sufficient to be able to access the 457 visa program under a $57,000 threshold. The industry in Victoria ($57,500) would just qualify. Many industries in the Northern Territory would be knocked out of the scheme, including retail trade ($56,900), agriculture, forestry and fishing ($55,800) and arts and recreation services ($56,800).
Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry employment director Jenny Lambert told The Australian the figure Labor has put forward on the TSMIT “is very concerning and the government should reject it out of hand.”
Labor has also proposed other amendments to the Migration Act to mandate labour market testing for investment facilitation agreements that apply to projects worth more than $150 million, ending a two-year freeze and restoring indexation, and stipulating that 457 visa holders in trades either hold the relevant licence or obtain one within 60 days of arriving.
Trade Minister Andrew Robb has promised to negotiate in “good faith’’ on Labor’s proposals.[/showhide]

news

Department of Immigration plays down decision to end processing of skilled visa claims

Date:-29-September-2015
sbs.com.au

 

The Department of Immigration has played down its decision to end processing 16,000 “Priority 5” visa claims, stating that those affected had the option of applying for other visas.
The Department stopped processing skilled migration visas under three sub-classes last week, after announcing it would do so earlier this year.
The decision has dismayed many people who were waiting a claim for what they call “points visas,” also known as “Priority 5″.[showhide type=”spoiler”] But the Department told SBS in a statement that the decision came down to numbers and fairness. “Most of the offshore applications in priority group 5 are for occupations that are not currently in demand on the Skilled Occupation List,” a spokesperson said. “This means that they are less likely to get a job if they migrate to Australia permanently.”
“That is why they are pushed to the end of the processing queue. The Government has determined that it is unfair to keep them waiting in the queue.”
“Most of the offshore applications in priority group 5 are for occupations that are not currently in demand on the Skilled Occupation List.”
“The Department receives more applications than there are visas available, and prioritises applications for processing according to legislation.” The “cap and cease” announcement affected people overseas who had applied for permanent skilled migration to Australia under three visa subclasses: subclass 175 (Skilled Independent), subclass 176 (Skilled Sponsored) and subclass 475 (Skilled Regional Sponsored).
The Department told SBS that approximately 16,000 applications would be ceased and their visa application charge refunded.[/showhide]

news

Department of Immigration plays down decision to end processing of skilled visa claims

Date:-29-September-2015
sbs.com.au

 

The Department of Immigration has played down its decision to end processing 16,000 “Priority 5” visa claims, stating that those affected had the option of applying for other visas.
The Department stopped processing skilled migration visas under three sub-classes last week, after announcing it would do so earlier this year.
The decision has dismayed many people who were waiting a claim for what they call “points visas,” also known as “Priority 5″.[showhide type=”spoiler”] But the Department told SBS in a statement that the decision came down to numbers and fairness. “Most of the offshore applications in priority group 5 are for occupations that are not currently in demand on the Skilled Occupation List,” a spokesperson said. “This means that they are less likely to get a job if they migrate to Australia permanently.”
“That is why they are pushed to the end of the processing queue. The Government has determined that it is unfair to keep them waiting in the queue.”
“Most of the offshore applications in priority group 5 are for occupations that are not currently in demand on the Skilled Occupation List.”
“The Department receives more applications than there are visas available, and prioritises applications for processing according to legislation.” The “cap and cease” announcement affected people overseas who had applied for permanent skilled migration to Australia under three visa subclasses: subclass 175 (Skilled Independent), subclass 176 (Skilled Sponsored) and subclass 475 (Skilled Regional Sponsored).
The Department told SBS that approximately 16,000 applications would be ceased and their visa application charge refunded.[/showhide]

news

Department of Immigration plays down decision to end processing of skilled visa claims

Date:-29-September-2015
sbs.com.au

 

The Department of Immigration has played down its decision to end processing 16,000 “Priority 5” visa claims, stating that those affected had the option of applying for other visas.
The Department stopped processing skilled migration visas under three sub-classes last week, after announcing it would do so earlier this year.
The decision has dismayed many people who were waiting a claim for what they call “points visas,” also known as “Priority 5″.[showhide type=”spoiler”] But the Department told SBS in a statement that the decision came down to numbers and fairness. “Most of the offshore applications in priority group 5 are for occupations that are not currently in demand on the Skilled Occupation List,” a spokesperson said. “This means that they are less likely to get a job if they migrate to Australia permanently.”
“That is why they are pushed to the end of the processing queue. The Government has determined that it is unfair to keep them waiting in the queue.”
“Most of the offshore applications in priority group 5 are for occupations that are not currently in demand on the Skilled Occupation List.”
“The Department receives more applications than there are visas available, and prioritises applications for processing according to legislation.” The “cap and cease” announcement affected people overseas who had applied for permanent skilled migration to Australia under three visa subclasses: subclass 175 (Skilled Independent), subclass 176 (Skilled Sponsored) and subclass 475 (Skilled Regional Sponsored).
The Department told SBS that approximately 16,000 applications would be ceased and their visa application charge refunded.[/showhide]

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